Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Ten Tips for More Veggie Consumption

Are vegetables a problem at your dinner table? Do your children promptly remove or push them aside? When was the last time your prompt of, "Eat your vegetables!" worked on your youngsters? I understand, we have the same problem. Audrey is getting old enough now that we can have conversations about nutritious, healthy foods and why it is good to eat them.

Here are some tips that might help you get a few vegetables into the children in your life. In no particular order...
  1. Plant a garden. Audrey loves to run out to the garden and pick lettuce for the evening meal. She even exclaims with delight that she grew the lettuce herself, as she is nibbling on it.
  2. Take a trip to the Farmer's Market. Children are naturally curious and they want to see what is so exciting on those tables.
  3. Cook together. It really is amazing how much more likely children are to try something if they help cook it. 
  4. Pick it yourself. Head to your local -pick-your-own farm and gather up some in-season vegetables. If children taste how fresh food can be they will be more likely learn to enjoy it.
  5. Make it funny. Audrey, Maurene and I love to make silly pizza faces or other objects with fruits and vegetables. They laugh and then nosh on their creations.
  6. Grocery shop together. This gives your little one input into food selection. Audrey loves to tell me which sweet peppers to select or pick the purple cauliflower over the white one.
  7. Presentation is everything. Check out some other blogs such as Bentolunch.net and Muffin Tin Mom for cute ideas on how to plate foods to make them look appealing.
  8. Curl up with a good book. A good cookbook, that is. Select one with a lot of pictures so your child can see how appealing the dish will end up.
  9. Read food books. We have, I Will Never, Not Ever Eat a Tomato and Too Much Junk Food. Both are excellent. 
  10. Talk about food in a positive way. The question I dislike most is, "Does Audrey like this food?" Why would I answer no? This will surely set her up to dislike the food. I always tell her that she has not learned to appreciate the food yet.
These are just a few of the examples of tips and tricks we have used to encourage our children to eat healthier and consume more vegetables. You will not notice a change overnight, but keep after it!

“I wrote this blog post while participating in the SocialMoms and Peas and Thank You blogging program for a gift card worth $30. For more information on how you can participate, click here.” 


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5 comments:

  1. When my kids went through their "No thank you, vegetables" phase, we added two cups of pureed veggies to pasta sauce (just don't add too much green and they'll never know. Carrots and zucchini are great adds). I also use pureed veggies in my meatloaf (and dry oatmeal instead of bread crumbs). Meatloaf night is now a joke. I serve it. They know it's filled with something. They all take their first bite. I ask "Is it good?" They say "Yep. What's in it this time?" :D The veggies became a habit =D

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  2. Okay, but what if it's *Mother* who hates her vegetables?

    40 years later, I still have to talk myself into 'em.

    Happily, I like leafy greens and broccoli and I've made my peace with peas, but, honestly, vegetables are yuck! :)

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  3. Hi, We absolutely LOVE, the Charlie and Lola books too!! Great post! I had fun writing mine as well. Happy Weekend! http://littleislandstudios.blogspot.com/

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  4. Arrange fruits and vegetables in a palatable display so the kids will love to eat them.

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  5. I make an extremely light "alfredo" with zucchini ribbons... yumm! I mix in the zucchini ribbons with whole wheat noodles. Favorite of kids and adults too!

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